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    Enhanced version of original printed entry     Encoded version: searched-for items red; some Appendix and Addenda included; unique identifier FTST826E
Fitzgerald, Edward.
Adm. pens. (age 17) at TRINITY, Feb. 7, 1826. [3rd] s. of John Purcell.
B. Mar. 31, 1809, at The White House, Bradfield, near Woodbridge, Suffolk.
School, King Edward VI, Bury St Edmunds (Dr Malkin). Matric. Michs. 1826; B.A. 1830.
Lodged at 19, King's Parade, 1826-30 (where there is a memorial plaque). His friends at Cambridge included W. M. Thackeray, John Allen, W. H. Thompson, Frank Edgeworth, Robert Groome, Charles Buller, Frederick Maurice, John M. Kemble, Blakesley, Merivale, Spedding, and Monckton Milnes: though contemporary with the Tennyson brothers, he did not come to know them until 1835.
Contributed to The Snob and The Gownsman, 1829-30.
Published translations of Moli're in Paris, 1829.
In his platonic dialogue, Euphranor, described an idyllic excursion on the Cam. Copied into his notebook shortly before his death Roger Ascham's words: 'He that is able to maintain his lyfe and learning at Cambridge knoweth not what a felicitie he hath.
I doe salute you all; I name none, because I would leave out none, and because I love all.' His lyric, The Meadows in Spring, appeared in 1831, and Charles Lamb wrote at the time that 'The Athenaeum has been hoaxed with some exquisite poetry.' In 1842 Thackeray introduced him to Carlyle, who, in search of materials for his Cromwell had visited the battlefield of Naseby in the company of Dr Arnold, and had been misled by an obelisk erected by Fitzgerald's father. 'Gurlyle,' as Fitzgerald called him, exclaimed: 'Why does the obelisk stand there? It might as well stand at Charing Cross; the blockhead that it is.' In 1846 met E. B. Cowell, later Professor of Sanskrit, who introduced him to the writings of Omar Khayym and other Persian poets.
His letters to Cowell in 1857 record the progress of the Rubiyt translation, which was published in its first version in 1859, but remained unknown for some years.
Rossetti and Swinburne discovered it on a stall in St Martin's Lane, priced at a penny.
It was said to have subsequently fetched 4000.
Tennyson tortuously speaks of the Rubiyt, 'than which I know no version done in English more divinely well'; and added a 'diffuse and opulent' epilogue after Fitzgerald's death.
Other honours included the Calderon medal for his Spanish translations.
He also translated Agamemnon and compiled a Dictionary of Mme de Sévigné. Married, Nov. 4, 1856, Lucy, dau. of his friend Bernard Barton, a Quaker bank-clerk, of Woodbridge.
Died in the night of June 13/14, 1883, at Merton rectory, Norfolk, during his annual visit to the rector, George Crabbe (III. 1819-84). 'He was buried beneath the church tower at Boulge, with the words on his tomb that Cowell had taught him to love:It is He that hath made us, and not we ourselves.' Among obituary remarks may be mentioned that of W. H. Thompson, Master of Trinity, who called him 'a prisoner in Doubting Castle,' and that of Carlyle, who saw him as 'a lonely, shy, kind-hearted man, who discharged the sacred rites of hospitality with a kind of zeal or piety.' Entrusted his manuscripts to W. Aldis Wright for posthumous publication; some letters, in the Trinity College Library, are still (1942) unpublished. [His brother John (1820) resembled him closely in character and appearance, and they were compared with Antipholus of Ephesus and Antipholus of Syracuse.
Their father, a descendant of Cromwell, took the name and arms of Fitzgerald in lieu of Purcell, Oct. 3, 1818, while they were living near Paris.
Edward was anxious to distinguish himself from Edward Marlborough (1824), who left in ill odour.] (A. C. Benson, English Men of Letters series; Aldis Wright, in D.N.B.; Ganz, A Fitzgerald Medley; Camb.
Bibliog.
Eng. Lit.
, III. 251-3 and 834; Thomas Wright, Life, which contains the 'Philosopher' and 'Statesman' photographs; R. H. Groome, Two Suffolk Friends; Changes of Name; Lamb, Letters, II. 938-9, 1013.)
Edward FITZGERALD
Approx. lifespan: 1809–1883
pens. aged 17 Trinity College adm1826:02:07
3rd s. of John Purcell FITZGERALD
b. 1809:03:31 at The White House, Bradfield, near Woodbridge, Suffolk ,
Sch: King Edward VI, Bury St Edmunds, [Suffolk], ( Dr – MALKIN )
Matric 1826:10MT:
BA 1830
Lodged at 19, King's Parade CB, ???, [Cambridgeshire], 1826-30
(where there is a memorial plaque)
His friends CB, [Cambridgeshire], included W. M. Thackeray, John Allen, W. H. Thompson, Frank Edgeworth, Robert Groome, Charles Buller, Frederick Maurice, John M. Kemble, Blakesley, Merivale, Spedding, and Monckton Milnes: though contemporary with the Tennyson brothers, he did not come to know them until1835
Contributed to The Snob and The Gownsman 1829-30
Published translations of Molière Paris, [France], 1829
In his platonic dialogue, Euphranor, described an idyllic excursion on the Cam. Copied into his notebook shortly before his death Roger Ascham's words: 'He that is able to maintain his lyfe and learning CB, ???, knoweth not what a felicitie he hath. I doe salute you all; I name none, because I would leave out none, and because I love all.' His lyric, The Meadows in Spring, appeared in1831, and Charles Lamb wrote at the time that ' The Athenaeum has been hoaxed with some exquisite poetry.'
In 1842
Thackeray introduced him to Carlyle, who, in search of materials for his Cromwell had visited the battlefield of Naseby, [Northamptonshire], in the company of Dr Arnold, and had been misled by an obelisk erected by Fitzgerald's father. 'Gurlyle,' as Fitzgerald called him, exclaimed: 'Why does the obelisk stand there? It might as well stand at Charing Cross; the blockhead that it is.'
In 1846
met E.
b. Cowell, later
Professor of: Sanskrit, who introduced him to the writings of Omar Khayyam and other Persian poets. His letters to Cowell in1857
record the progress of the Rubaiyat translation, which was published in its first version in1859, but remained unknown for some years. Rossetti and Swinburne discovered it on a stall St Martin's Lane, [London], , priced at a penny. It was said to have subsequently fetched £4000. Tennyson tortuously speaks of the Rubaiyat, 'than which I know no version done in English more divinely well'; and added a 'diffuse and opulent' epilogue after Fitzgerald's death.
Other honours included the Calderon Medal for his Spanish translations. He also translated Agamemnon and compiled a Dictionary of Mme de Sévigné.
m. 1856:11:04,Lucy dau. of his friend Bernard Barton, a Quaker bank-clerk, of Woodbridge, [Suffolk],
d. in the night of 13:06:/14 1883,at Merton rectory, Norfolk , , during his annual visit to the rector, George Crabbe (III. (1819-84). 'He was buried beneath the church tower Boulge, [Suffolk], , with the words on his tomb that Cowell had taught him to love:"It is He that hath made us, and not we ourselves."' Among obituary remarks may be mentioned that of W. H. Thompson, Master of: : Trinity College, who called him 'a prisoner in Doubting Castle,' and that of Carlyle, who saw him as 'a lonely, shy, kind-hearted man, who discharged the sacred rites of hospitality with a kind of zeal or piety.'
Entrusted his manuscripts to W. Aldis Wright for posthumous publication; some letters, in the Trinity College Library, are still (1942) unpublished.
His brother John (1820) resembled him closely in character and appearance, and they were compared with Antipholus of Ephesus and Antipholus of Syracuse. Their father, a descendant of Cromwell, took the name and arms of Fitzgerald in lieu of Purcell 1818:10:03, while they were living near Paris, [France],
Edward was anxious to distinguish himself from Edward Marlborough (1824), who left in ill odour.]
(A. C. Benson, English Men of Letters series; Aldis Wright, in D.N.B. ;Ganz, A Fitzgerald Medley; Cambridge Bibliog. ??? English Lit., III. 251-3 and 834; Thomas Wright, Life, which contains the 'Philosopher' and 'Statesman' photographs; R. H. Groome, Two Suffolk Friends; Changes of Name ; Lamb, Letters, II. 938-9, 1013)
[add:]Portrait in pencil by J. Spedding in Fitzwilliam Museum[:add]
[add:]Goodison; CP: 192[:add]

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